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Post Info TOPIC: Hearth pad
Peg


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Hearth pad


Not sure this really belongs in the flooring section butblankstare....I need to build a hearth pad for my pellet stove since I just threw it up on some pavers last year when we bought it. I'd like for the hearth to be smooth enough that it's not such a pain to slide the stove away from the wall if you need to work on it. The stove sits in a corner and the pad needs to be roughly 40"x 40".  The current pad is 2 1/4" thick and I need to stay with that number if at all possible so that the vent pipe doesn't have to be moved. There is hardwood flooring under the pad and I'd really rather not make any holes in it or damage it so I'm thinking that I can secure the pad by attaching it through the baseboard molding to the wall studs to anchor it in place. My thinking is that if we decide to do away with the stove one day I'd like for my floor to be in good shape so I can simply remove the hearth pad.
I'd considered just building a nice looking wooden frame, filling it to the desired height with cement board, and the laying tile on top but I think the grout lines would make sliding the stove a little dicey. (The bottom of the stove is a platform, BTW, not legs.) Now I'm wondering if I could just frame it out and pour a concrete pad in place? I'm thinking something similar to a concrete countertop? I've never polished concrete though so I have no idea how messy this could get. Could I use a random orbital for this or would I need to rent equipment? If I did use concrete does anyone have any suggestions as to what I could use as a barrier between it and the hardwood floor? Any ideas? I'm completely open to suggestions on this one! weirdface
Thanks,
Peg


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Sounds like a perfect place for Come On's cement tinting talents......I am sure he will be on with some advise.

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We had a similar issue with my youngest son's cabin several years ago and we built a box out of 1x2's and then covered the bottom with a piece of thick aluminum.  We glued a piece of fire-retardant board on the bottom (for the life of me, I can't remember what it was called but it wasn't but about a 1/4" thick).  His stove was an old pot-bellied that we just set inside the box and then we put some real pretty rocks inside to "just" cover the aluminum.  It looked real nice, worked real nice and did not hurt the hardwood floors at all.

Good Luck,
Mello

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That's a really nifty idea Mello, I'll bet it looks cool. We make and sell concrete hearth pads in many sizes. I don't polish 'em though Peg...if you're goin' for that kinda look it does get messy. I do polish the tabletops and countertops that we make, but it's that kinda application. I use a Makita wet polisher with pads from 50 grit to 3,000 for that. I'll try to post a pic for ya...hope it resizes.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh79/GTLCrete/HearthPad002.jpg

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh79/GTLCrete/Hearth-stages.jpg

We make 'em "in shop" 2" thick usually...the 48"x48" weighs a good 300lbs. Folks set 'em right on their floors of all kinds with no issues. We put rebar mesh in 'em too...if ya make one and then move it, do it on edge. It's stronger that way.

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I did the direct link instead of posting...I have resizing issues. Hope the links work.

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way cool, is that just concrete that you have colored to look like brick and tile?


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Peg


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Very cool! I like the gray one. It wouldn't go with my floor but I like it anyway. wink I'd thought about making it outside like one giant stepping stone but then I did a little math and figured out how much it would weight and changed my mind! Yikes! The stove weighs 300 and I know what a struggle it was for the two of us to get THAT up the steps so...I think if I'm going with concrete it's going to have to be poured in place. I'm really wondering if I build up and inch with cement board if I can get away with only an inch of concrete. That sure would be less mixing and hauling.

Really, the only reason I want to polish it is to make it slicker so the stove will slide out easier. Last winter we had some problems with the stove and I'd get mad as heck because I could fix it but I couldn't get it away from the wall by myself to get TO it!  angered.gif I think I've got all the kinks out of it now but...
just in case, I want to be able to pull it out without calling for help. I've actually threatened to put wheels on the doggone thing. Or something like a drawer slide made out of angle iron. biggrin

Opps! Lightning! Gotta shut this puppy down!
Later,
Peg

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Another coinky-dink...we had lightning earlier. The actual mix doesn't need to be very wet. In fact for the tabletops, countertops, hearth pads and projects like those my mix is quite dry...much easier to handle and less mess. You can use regular old fashioned bagged sand mix for that...I do. I also add a bit of Portland Cement from the bag for strength. Mix it so you can ball it up and it stays in shape...no oozing or dripping. An inch of concrete isn't very strong, as you know, the cement board would buy you some height and definately less mixing. You could wrap plywood in poly for that matter if it's more readily available.
In the U.S. Sherwin Williams handles some great products under the H&C label. Those stains will give you any color you want. They also sell a urethane sealer that is tough as nails and cures to a high mil...this would most likely give you as much slide-ability as polishing would with far less mess.
Sorry I'm so long winded here, but I'm just tryin' to help and this is something I actually know about. weirdface Thanx for the compliment there Mello, I appreciate that. I individually stain each hearth pad myself...I like to do it...the "grout lines" are engraved after the stain is dry. Same as what I do on floors, driveways, etc.

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Peg


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Well, I spent a whole day looking at tile locally and on the net and I finally found a look that I really like but.....the price is outrageous! shocked.gif I have plans to restore the fireplace in the living room to look something like this and I decided that the hearth pad, even though it's in the adjoining room should match at least somewhat. I'm still tossing around the idea of pouring the pad and simply using the detail, the 6 by and the smaller tiles, from this pattern as corner details on the pad. That would put the project within budget but I dunno. I've got soooo many other things I need to work on right now that I may just put this off for another year. The pad the stove is sitting on is ugly but it works so....maybe I'd better work on extending the vent pipe through the eave instead. Not as sexy but more practical. hmm I'm running out of summer and NOT running out of things I need to get done.

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