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Post Info TOPIC: Can a breaker go bad and not kick off


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Can a breaker go bad and not kick off


The a/c was not getting cold when I got off work so I checked the filter and it was dirty so it was replaced but still not cold so I checked the a/c unit outside and it was not on,I checked the fuse outside for the a/c with a meter and seem good and cycled the breaker in the basement and still does not work.   After work I will see if its getting any power to the box outside but if its not then it has to be the breaker,can a breaker go bad and not kick off.



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Maybe....Check voltage on each side of the breaker, that will tell you if thats the problem.

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Be sure and check back when you get in from work because our resident/in house Electrical expert may just see this and have some suggestions or solutions for you.

Hey Rumbler, you're needed at the front office biggrin

meller



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The answer is a definite yes.  Using your voltmeter, start by checking the votage on the main breaker input and output from hot to ground on both legs, and from hot leg to hot leg.  If all is correct at 120/120/240 (approximately), go to the breaker for the a/c and do the same on the output that feeds the a/c unit; make sure the breaker is reset and in the on configuration; if again correct (120/120/240), leave it on and go to the fused disconnect at the a/c unit and run the drill again with the fuses in and the switch closed (on).  If you have correct voltage all the way through, it's time to call the a/c repairman.  If somewhare along the line you find other than 120/120/240, for example zero or a very low reading like 0/120/120 the device you are checking is faulty.



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Rrumbler - Broken and grouchy, but not dead - yet. Bangin' and twistin' on stuff for some sixty years or so.
WT


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And use a Lo-Z voltmeter or a "Wiggy" so that Phantom Voltages don't confuse you. You can also modify your voltmeter with a 50 cent part from Radio Shack to make it low impedance.



-- Edited by WT on Friday 17th of August 2012 03:44:06 PM

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A "wiggy" is handy, and would be a fair guide in this case, but it does not read accurately enough for serious voltage testing; and the "enhanced" voltmeter would be overkill for this use, I think.  A basic Radio Shack or home center electrical department digital will give the needed info within a volt or two, close enough.  Now, if it was in a PLC, or some other electronic app, yeppers, the "enhanced" meter would be the real ticket.  I always have a "wiggy" in my belt bag, and an analog voltmeter in my handy box for checking for "wild legs" in three phase setups, but if I get into more sensitive stuff, I get on to the Flukes.  Of course, I don't hardly do any of that any more, I'm broken, and re-tireded.  I like the analog for rough testing because it gives me an immediate visual indication in the needle swing, even out of the corner of my eye, while I am paying attention to my probes; I have to take my eyes off of them to check a digital.  Truth be told, I probably ought to sell off most of that stuff and get me some beer money - for the beer I don't drink anymore.confuseconfusebiggrin



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Rrumbler - Broken and grouchy, but not dead - yet. Bangin' and twistin' on stuff for some sixty years or so.
WT


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Thank you for that inspirational message! biggrinconfuse

And I have a o'scope that I bought in the 80s that I hardly use.  And radios to repair using that scope that I don't use.  

Fixing stuff is not so much fun anymore as they are a nuisance and a chore.  Maybe learning new things made it fun.

I did spend 7 hours on my 30 YO gas furnace though; the blower wouldn't go because, after chasing some wild geese, I found there was a corroded connection on a printed circuit board edge connector that had 3 megohms resistance instead of zero.

-- Edited by WT on Saturday 18th of August 2012 12:55:10 PM



-- Edited by WT on Saturday 18th of August 2012 01:00:52 PM

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