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Post Info TOPIC: Need diagram...3 way switch


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Need diagram...3 way switch


Hey guys...I would Google this, but not sure what its called.

Its when you have a light switch at the bottom of the stairs and another at the top controlling a light......2 way, 3 way, Im not sure what its called. I took it in school, but that was a lifetime ago....lol

Can someone point me to a diagram, what switches and wire (14/3 I think) I need

 

thanks

Harry



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RE: Need diagram


i cant draw worth crap. i just think of lectric as water. it has a flow. hahaha.

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Hopefully Rrumbler will post on this but just incase he doesn't, here is a video that even I could understand hahaha

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7smZbyBSVTg



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Harry - it's called a 3 way switch for some dumb reason. There are several diagrams here - three way switches diagrams (use as your google phrase)

What's more interesting are FOUR way switchesno



-- Edited by Dave W on Monday 17th of September 2012 12:08:30 PM



-- Edited by Dave W on Monday 17th of September 2012 12:09:19 PM

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Couldn't ask for a better description than that guy gives.  Here is a link to his written explanation with a diagram.

 

http://www.askmediy.com/electrical/3033-how-to-wire-a-3-way-switch-with-video.html



-- Edited by Rrumbler on Monday 17th of September 2012 06:04:08 PM

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Thanks guys....Looking at it, my problem is that I cant go through both switches and then to the light...My power source is at one of the switches and the light. I am adding the 2nd switch and dont want to tear out walls, just fish a single cable through. I found this that I think may work.



Also, are there special 3 way switches?



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I would not call them "special", they are different.  If you look at a switch for residential and general commercial applications, the kind you will be using, there are terminals on the side with screws.  One wit two screws is called a single pole switch and is the basic light switch found in all "one switch/ond device" applications.  In fact, that switch could be called a single pole, two way switch; a terminal is referred to as a "way" in general electrical engineering parlance, and a pole refers to the number of hot wire, or legs that the switch is desined for.  For purposes of our discussion, we are dealing with a single hot leg (wire), thus the "single pole designation.  For your purposes, Poncho, you will use two "single pole, three way" switches: three terminals on the switch, with only a single hot wire feeding the circuit.  There are also four way switches, with four terminals on them; wring them is basically inserting one or more into a circuit between two three way switches.

That diagram is correct if the power source, as you call it, the feed or hot leg, comes in to the light box.  If the hot leg comes in to the switch box, then a different arrangement would be used - similar, but not exactly the same as that one.  Another thing you must consider is: right now, you probably have only two wire plus ground cables feeding the circuit; you must get a three wire run between the two three way switches in order for it to work.  If it means opening up the wall, do it, rather than trying to "haywire" things.  Most Romex or BX cable is stapled at each end of a run within six to tweelve inches of the box, and you can reach up or down into a wall beside the box with a long screwdriver or pry bar and pop the staple out, then tie onto the cable in the box, tape the tie-on to make it smooth, and you might be able to pull the three wire/ground through with the old two wire, but in my experience, this is a rather chancy operation, and you might need to keep the two wire in place, as well; I prefer opening the wall and having to patch and re-paint; much easier to do the job right that way.  You will have to open up the wall to install the new switch, anyway; you will have to install the box, and drill the studs to get the wire through.



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Yep, you are probably right....It is being used where I am installing that sliding door I mentioned on another thread. I am cutting straight down from the window it is replacing, so no drywall work.....I have to mess with the siding on the outside, so will likely cut out some of the plywood on the outside to do this wiring. The current switch and light feed is in the garage and easy to get at. The switch I want to put in is for the outside light that I want to control from the garage or at the sliding door

 

One more question....In that pic I show above, what is the purpose of him putting black tape on the white wires?



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Got the electrical done today, works good......I can now switch the outside patio lights on from the garage exit or where the new patio door will be. Also installed a light just outside the patio door ...Scheduled to install the door on Tues if all goes well.

Thanks for the drawing and advice Rumbler



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cool poncho.good deal on the switches. give us a peak at it when its all done.

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I guess you might say that 'ol Rumbler is the "SPARK" in Handyman Forum, huh?



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its a good thing. we need it. hahaha...i know just enough to get in trouble.when i do any major wirin i get it looked over. theres genley somethin i need help with. yep, rumbler is the spark.

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RE: Need diagram...3 way switch


Ha, I am only ten days late to this party; sorry 'bout that.  The work is all done, and you obviously figured it out, got it working right.

But, to answer your Q about the black tape on the white wire: it is simply for identification.  When you are working with pre-assembled cable like Romex or BX, often times you do not need a neutral in a certain part of the circuit, but do need an extra "hot leg"; that is when you change the identity of the neutral, which is always white or grey, by marking it with a different color tape to identify it as a "hot leg", or in theis case,  "traveler".  The demonsrator used black tape, but I always mark my travelers in three and four way circuits with yellow, orange, or purple tape; so when someone opens up one of my installations, they will find black, white, and/or red wires marked with yellow tape to indicate the travelers in a three way or four way installation.

When I was installing new work or open remodel work in custom homes or commercial/industrial sites, I used flex conduit as much as I could, and just pulled in what ever color of wires I needed, instead of having to re-identify a conductor like that.  That type of insallation also makes trouble shooting and possible repair/replacement of conductors, or future additions to the installation much easier if that becomes necessary.  I truly hated to get into a situation where I had to sort out a problem in a Romex installation that involved finding an open or short in a conductor or cable; it usually involved cutting holes in walls.  In one instance, I just pulled down all the drywall, rewired the whole mess, and re-did the walls.  Mucho hassle, but easier than pokin' here and there, over and over.



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