Home Handyman

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: I did it again - dammit


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:
I did it again - dammit


My wife has on her honey do list - REGROUT THE BATHTUB TILE!! (yes, in capitals). So, yesterday, scrapers in hand decided it was time. I started to dig out the cracked grout as well as a gallon or so of silicone the last owner thoughtfully installed and found a mess - mold. Lots of mold. I peeled a piece of tile loose and the builder, 42 years ago apparently had used conventional sheet rock - and the paper is peeling and the rock is mushy. OK - I'm going to dry the rock out, seal it as well as possible then put some cheap tile from Lowe's back on the bottom row to make it through the holidays and visitations from relatives. We went out today and priced tub and wall enclosures and those come out less expensive the trying to repair the existing walls more permanently especially since the 42 year old tub has lost most of its enamel - and it's cast iron. I have a nice 10 pound sledge which will reduce that to manageable pieces as it wont fit down the stair well without doing some major damage - which reminds me - anyone have experience doing that. The only other one I've done, my father in law took out one day when I was working. I assume you just pick an unsupported place and whang away. Guess we should have moved to Virginia and a newer house.

Yes Em, photos will follow



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Hahaha, got me pretty well figured, eh???

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Administrator

Status: Offline
Posts: 2158
Date:

Dave...Remember you can get the old one down in many pieces, but the new one has to come up in one piece.....Good luck with the project

__________________

http://ontariorodders.activeboard.com/



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

poncho62 wrote:

Dave...Remember you can get the old one down in many pieces, but the new one has to come up in one piece.....Good luck with the project


  The new one - not gonna be a 300 pound cast iron monster.    I also have a month to think about it too



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1528
Date:

Seems if it wasn't for bad luck, you wouldn't have any at all, Dave.



__________________
Rrumbler - Broken and grouchy, but not dead - yet. Bangin' and twistin' on stuff for some sixty years or so.


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5596
Date:

Not that you don't know Dave,, but hitting that Enamel (porcelain) with a hammer will shatter and send shrapnel flying everywhere, and imbed in anything it hits,, especially human flesh, old aged human skin is especially vonerable,winkbiggrin 

A good sawsall and lots of blades might get it in more manageable sizes,  don't know how I woud approach that situation,need lots of time to think this one over,, while looking else where for a place to live,biggrin  Can you cut up cast iron with a saw?? confuse

 



__________________

Day br />http://s670.photobucket.com/albums/vv68/BADRAT01/
 

https://picasaweb.google.com/106336891618669151824/ALLANGLIA1BuildPictures#



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Rrumbler - this is one of the joys of owning a home - especially one that was built 42 years ago.

BR - I did a google and looked at a couple of plumbing and home restoration sites - and the general concensus was first, and probably 90% was break it up. The other, remove in one piece - which is virtually impossible in a center hall colonial with a narrow stair well that has a 90* turn. My biggest concern is that the developer who built probably 2000 homes in our town before a decent code was put in place, while barely within even today's codes, skimped on dimensional building materials. Here's one of the contractor sites with Post #17 here is about the most sensible I've seen  - http://www.contractortalk.com/f18/cast-iron-tub-removal-33315/

 

"Here's the secret.

Step
1 - Remove drain and overflow

2 - Sledge around perimeter of valley inside tub. You will be able to break completely thru with minimal effort.

3 - Whack and crack corners of tub walls. (Inside tub)

4 - Next whack and crack all 4 corners by hitting down on top rails at the corners.

5 - This will give you 5 manageable pieces one man can easily manage. The piece with skirt and front interior wall of the tub is hard for some to carry. If necessary break in half by whacking center of skirt, then center interior tub wall, and finally one good crack center top rail.

You will wind up with 5 -6 nice chunks of iron, 10 - 15 lbs. of chunks and bits, 1/2 dustpan full of really sharp shards of porcelain.

This is a 30 -60 minute job. All moaning, groaning, and catching your wind breaks included"

 

Now, if a couple of NFL linebackers aren't busy, say about New Years time or so, maybe I would change my mind on how to remove that chunk .........

And taking care of that sensitive and tender OF skin - know all about that problem and have the scars and lumps to prove it!!!



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Great play by play, Dave, but you know what would make it even better? biggrinbiggrinbiggrin



__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Mello Yello wrote:

Great play by play, Dave, but you know what would make it even better? biggrinbiggrinbiggrin


 They're in the camera but the wifi connected laptop isn't a good choice to upload photos for some reason

As far as beating the tub into submission - soonconfuse



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5596
Date:

that play by play discription. sounds like it came from someone that has done it before,, piece-a-cake,,confuse??????????no grease up the ole sledge

wonder what all those ole plumbers on that site do for "plumbers crack" ? might be a good question to ask em,,,,biggrin



-- Edited by Bad Rat on Monday 10th of December 2012 03:10:18 PM

__________________

Day br />http://s670.photobucket.com/albums/vv68/BADRAT01/
 

https://picasaweb.google.com/106336891618669151824/ALLANGLIA1BuildPictures#



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Bad Rat wrote:

 

wonder what all those ole plumbers on that site do for "plumbers crack" ? might be a good question to ask em,,,,biggrin



-- Edited by Bad Rat on Monday 10th of December 2012 03:10:18 PM


 

I know what I do to combat that infamous 'plumber's crack'  - braces, suspenders, gallus's are my usual handyman's apparel



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Dave W wrote:
Bad Rat wrote:

 

wonder what all those ole plumbers on that site do for "plumbers crack" ? might be a good question to ask em,,,,biggrin



-- Edited by Bad Rat on Monday 10th of December 2012 03:10:18 PM


 

I know what I do to combat that infamous 'plumber's crack'  - braces, suspenders, gallus's are my usual handyman's apparel


 Oooooo THAT CRACK - - -sometimes it takes me a while - duh



__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5596
Date:

heres a good place to start,  they have some of the toughest pants anywhere,, makes a beaver need falsies,,,,,http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/mens/duluth-ingenuity/mens-longtail-t-shirts/mens-longtail-t-shirts.aspx?src=g200099&admkt=&s_kwcid=TC|8004|duluth%20trading||S|b|20577969481&gclid=CL72ioefkbQCFSTZQgodlSMAqw



-- Edited by Bad Rat on Monday 10th of December 2012 08:56:48 PM

__________________

Day br />http://s670.photobucket.com/albums/vv68/BADRAT01/
 

https://picasaweb.google.com/106336891618669151824/ALLANGLIA1BuildPictures#



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1528
Date:

Dave W wrote:


Rrumbler - this is one of the joys of owning a home - especially one that was built 42 years ago.

 

 

 

I know all about that, Dave, that house we just moved out of was buil in '61, remodeled several times.  I never got into anything there that didn't wind up taking me three times longer and a bunch of bucks more than I figured, even trying to account for the potential I knew was waiting to jump up and get me.



__________________
Rrumbler - Broken and grouchy, but not dead - yet. Bangin' and twistin' on stuff for some sixty years or so.


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:
RE: I did it again - dammit - and now more


I'm finally getting back to the bathroom project and have measured up the existing 'hole' for that bath tub/surround kit and it will fit just fine and am ready to order - except!!! And there is always that word. Yeah, the water piping will need a couple of zigs or zags to fit, but that was to be expected and not a big deal. What is a bigger deal is the drain with the existing one right tight against a floor joist and of course the wrong side of that joist. I either (1) go back to the drawing board and look at a different tub arrangement which isn't a good option, (2) just chop the joist to fit the drain, which also isn't a good option strength wise or (3) after removing the existing tub, open the ceiling below, which is just above the stove, carefully cut out a couple of feet or whatever is needed, tie the adjoining joists with identical size wood, probably doubled on all four sides for strength, and building an access box, for no better name. I'm doubling the wood, probably overkill, but these homes were built minimally to the then existing codes in 1970 and 35 or so gallons of water at ~300#, plus my 200#, plus the tile, plus, plus, plus is getting up in the 6-700 or more pound range on a pretty small footprint.

Comments guys - and especially on (3) idea



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 4169
Date:
RE: I did it again - dammit


dave im votin on no. 3. it aint easy but its the best fix.it aint over kill. its what should be there anyway.

__________________
born with nothin....still got most of it...
CHS


Veteran Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 284
Date:

Dave,

Modifing the plumbing from underneath will save you a lot of headaches and will make it easier.  As for getting the tile and wall down, I've used a dremel with a drywall tip or roto-zip. Cut all along the top then pull outward in manageable sections. Most of the tile will stay attached to the drywall. That tub is another story and will have to be broken up if you can't turn it sideways and drag it down and out.



__________________
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again.


Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 5596
Date:

I have to agree with John,, its always easier to work over your head than standing on your head,, plus a axcess hole would be hand in case of future plumbing problems,, but right over the stove it is going to be more obvious, but with no other choice, maybe build the cover to the hole so it matches the ceiling, ( as best you can) with some nice trim,

as for getting cut up by flying porcelin, maybe throw a tarp or heavy blanket over the tub before doing the hammer whackin, to prevent them flying all over ,,



-- Edited by Bad Rat on Wednesday 30th of January 2013 03:33:46 PM

__________________

Day br />http://s670.photobucket.com/albums/vv68/BADRAT01/
 

https://picasaweb.google.com/106336891618669151824/ALLANGLIA1BuildPictures#



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Call Red Green and see how he would get the tub down the stairs and then call your insurance agent and make sure that bathrooms are covered during an explosion. Then you should be good to go !



__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

BEFORE the bathroom, the 'hole' for the refrigerator needs to be enlarged from 35 to 40 inches. My DW has mumbled about how bad the existing 15 plus year old one is for access. So, being the good hubby that I try to be, am now undertaking that job. Three cabinets need to be taken down, a 2-1/2 inch spacer put on each side then reassembled. So far, have two cabinets down - OMG - I had no idea that I used so many screws when I did the original installation. If 3 will hold something in place, 6 will do it better. The biggest problem is that two of the cabinets back up to a pocket door which means little support and probably why so many screws. A couple photos to follow, Em



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

OK - kitchen cabinet move. Fairly easy - EXCEPT - that @#$% pocket door installation in back of the furthest right cabinets (as you look at them) really has no studding to screw into so every fastener is a 'crap shoot'. I'm done with the exception of router(ing) up some new molding for the top and bottom of the cabinet over the refrigerator. If was to ever redo the kitchen completely, I would build 2x walls instead of using the fancy panels the kitchen vendor recommended 18 years ago. But since that ain't gonna happen .......

Photos not in order 1 and 4 are together, 2-3 ditto



-- Edited by Dave W on Monday 4th of February 2013 12:21:37 PM

Attachments
__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Nice "EndsAllation" Dave - - - - thanks for the pics !

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:


OK - kinda been neglecting to 'show up' here, but my rear quarters are dragging.

We went out Thursday afternoon and bought our new tub and enclosure and asked for a delivery sometime next week so I could get everything ready. OK, 0730 Friday, yesterday morning it arrived. This meant my procrastinations came to a rude and sudden halt. Yesterday I stripped the tile, saving probably 80-90% and pulled down the dry wall. Oh crud, one wall - wet, wet, wet and the blown in insulation is soggy (see one of the first posts).

Cast iron tubs are heavy - even in smaller pieces. I used one of my long, heavy bars (originally a Model T drive shaft and a legacy from my FIL), drove it through the middle of the tub, end to end, splitting it in half. Then up the inside, finishing it with my 10 pound sledge. It broke up in 5 big pieces and 2-3 smaller plus a couple of dust pans of even smaller shards - and it's already gone to the metals bin at the transfer station. Before y'all ask, ear muffs, goggles and gloves were worn. Those porcelain chips are beyond sharp. Two finger dings - went right through the leather.

The drain for the new tub will be centered right in the middle of a floor joist - so I'll be pulling up a section of sub floor as well as opening the ceiling (directly over the stove) and doing my mods. And that sub floor - I'll put something better there anyhow as I do want to raise the tub about an inch or so anyhow and at the same level of the tile.

Oh and just to make sure my rear quarters dragged some more today, I spent over an hour sitting on the tractor as well as using the little snow blower to clear the drive and walks (we only had about 4-6 inches, but it was cold (14*F)

Photos will follow tomorrow (or whenever I get them downloaded)

__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

You're an inspiration to us all, Dave, well maybe not an inspiration but I, for one, do enjoy knowing that at least someone is productive around the house.

I sure like the new avatar - - - your neighborhood????

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Mello Yello wrote:

You're an inspiration to us all, Dave, well maybe not an inspiration but I, for one, do enjoy knowing that at least someone is productive around the house.

I sure like the new avatar - - - your neighborhood????


 I just mean to please. Actually,all I'm trying to do is catch up on projects that were neglected when we thought/hoped we were going to move to VA. Now - my DW has aspirations to move in 2-3 years and maybe to the Republic of Tejas.

The avatar is from a camping trip to the Thousand Islands - that's the St Lawrence River at the outlet of Lake Ontario. It's so easy to change them here, I just pick one and off it goes. My laptop has a limited number, but the desktop...... yawnbiggrin Some more from that trip



-- Edited by Dave W on Saturday 9th of February 2013 08:18:48 PM

Attachments
__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

You're always welcome in the Republic !

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 4169
Date:

nice work dave.

__________________
born with nothin....still got most of it...


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

This project just gets funner and funner (read that as expensiver and more expensiver)

As I noted above, the new tub drain and a floor joist meet in the middle. Yesterday I trotted myself out to the big box stores for a drain. I brought one home - junk, flimsy, and will be returned. What I did find on line is a side draining drain that will allow me to
install the tub without having to completely chop out that joist, just notch it plus reinforce it with some 2x4 or 6. Of course all that took was more money. Also, of course, couldn't find one locally so have to buy on-line with delivery probably mid next week if I add 'processing' and 'delivery' times.

This is what it looks like: http://www.pexsupply.com/Gerber-41-807-Bath-Drain-Brass-Pop-Up-with-pre-adjustable-linkage-Fit-All-Side-Outlet-4526000-p. This is the place I buy my odd ball stuff for the baseboard heating system and usually much cheaper even with shipping. The price of the drain is at about half of anyone elses, even including shipping and (grrrr) NY sales tax.

So - my "scheduled" ( ) one week job has gone to a warm place I hope to never visit.

Photos to follow - honest!



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Dave, that drain thingie is finer than fur on'a frog.
Sure gonna make the "total" job easier on you, it seems?

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Mello Yello wrote:

Dave, that drain thingie is finer than fur on'a frog.
Sure gonna make the "total" job easier on you, it seems?


 I'm surprised other companies then Gerber don't have something similar. I'm sure I'm far from the first person with a joist or other thing in the way. I brought home a new P-trap - that too is going back. I cannot believe what crap is being sold - and this is a 'standard' Sch 40 trap - NOT. It fits Sch 40 piping, but it's about 1/3rd as heavy wall.

When I post the photos I'll do some more description of what I did as well as found. Not my first bathroom redo, but so far, the most different



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1528
Date:

I'm pretty sure you probably thought of it already, but scabbing on a bridge block where you notch the joist would be a good idea, IMO.



__________________
Rrumbler - Broken and grouchy, but not dead - yet. Bangin' and twistin' on stuff for some sixty years or so.


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Rrumbler wrote:

I'm pretty sure you probably thought of it already, but scabbing on a bridge block where you notch the joist would be a good idea, IMO.


 If it's what I think you mean, yes, I'll be doubling up at least one side probably 18" beyond the notch (remember, I built turbines, not housesbiggrin so my terms aren't all the same)



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

I did a Photobucket album of the ongoing projects. Some comments can be seen by clicking on photos. Unfortunately Photobucket kinda scrambled the order - like 180*

http://s70.photobucket.com/albums/i84/Irelandschild/Bath%20and%20kitchen%20remodel/  (you'll have to copy and paste as I can never figure how to insert a link here )

Here's 'teaser'



-- Edited by Dave W on Tuesday 12th of February 2013 11:36:00 AM

Attachments
__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Looks like it's going your way, Dave

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1528
Date:

Dave W wrote:
Rrumbler wrote:

I'm pretty sure you probably thought of it already, but scabbing on a bridge block where you notch the joist would be a good idea, IMO.


 If it's what I think you mean, yes, I'll be doubling up at least one side probably 18" beyond the notch (remember, I built turbines, not housesbiggrin so my terms aren't all the same)


 Perzactly, Dave.  I only built at houses, as far as framing goes, but I did build lots of other stuff.  I suppose some wood butchers and engineer types might say to double up the whole joist, but I think of it the same way as adding a fishplate to a joint or a notch in a steel structure.



__________________
Rrumbler - Broken and grouchy, but not dead - yet. Bangin' and twistin' on stuff for some sixty years or so.


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Still waiting on my side drain - it shipped so maybe tomorrow if UPS is delivering on a "holiday". My wife helped me drag the tub upstairs. Not really heavy disassembled with 3 pieces, but ungainly to make it around that 90* turn in the stair well without tearing up wall paper. The manufacturer has a flaky way of assembling the tub. They screw to the studs - fine, but also use just automotive plastic Xmas trees (for things like upholstery and wheel wells) to mate the walls and the tub. I can get to one end easily, the long side by breaking through the drywall in a closet so will use 1" SS bolts. The last side, I can reach both corners so they will get the bolts as well

Since I'm stuck in neutral with the bath tub install, the DW decided that the BR needed a new exhaust fan - which meant that I needed to go up to that nasty attic with the blown in insulation covered with an old style 'glass batts. Dammmmm, I HATE that stuff. Even with a dust mask, I'm still hawking up black crud. Then the itchies from the glass.......... I bought a 90cfm HD Hampton Bay unit. It seems to work well plus doesn't sound like a diesel on high idle like the old one and looks nice, but the easy(?) wire connectors are junk so had to direct wire after one wire broke.

I LOOOOVVVVVEEEEEEE retirement



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Don't know if this tid-bit will work for you, Dave, but it sure did for me. Most folks wrap up with high necked buttoned shirts and long sleeves buttoned to keep everything off of them as much as possible. HOWEVER, what worked best for me was almost obscene - - - - - I would wear cut off shorts and shoes with no socks (not a pretty visual is it?) BUT if you do this then you must remember not to rub your skin, wipe the sweat or much less scratch - - - - when you are finished go quitely to the shower and stand under a strong spray so that the insulation is washed off of your body and down the drain. NOW LIKE I SAID - - - it works very well for me but different folks have different strokes.

I actually stoled this technique from a Professional Insulator when I saw them putting up fiberglass batting and told them how stupid I thought they were - - - - well they didn't KMA they just educated me and I was forever gratefull.

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Wouldn't be a bad idea - except I would have had to crawl across about 25 feet 4-5 times ( always have the wrong tools or forgot a wire nut ) in that crud in 30 degree weather (and about the same temp in the attic). Thinking about that makes a certain area of the body shrink to miniature size.



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Wouldn't be a bad idea - except I would have had to crawl across about 25 feet 4-5 times ( always have the wrong tools or forgot a wire nut ) in that crud in 30 degree weather (and about the same temp in the attic). Thinking about that makes a certain area of the body shrink to miniature size.



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Yeah, I forget that I was working in East Texas and not Upstate New York - - - does make a difference I 'magine.

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Still going on my tub install. I got all of the bracing in, the tub trial fit with scrap to build up the floor to finished height - hallelujah - with the build up, don't have to cut that joist. I just now have to do my final PVC glue up of the drains and install the flooring - EXCEPT - the 3/4" ($$$$) which had a one way bow, now is twisted and has a curl. Not junk, but Georgia- Pacific plywood The cheap 1/2 inch is totally flat.  No frickin' way can I draw that straight with a bod of screws. Out to get a fresh piece today from the lumber yard not the big box store. Might be seeing the other end of that tunnel over the weekend. More photos will be posted soon, Em.



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

hahaha, got me figured don'tcha Dave - - - - that raised floor idea sounds like the "cat's meow" - - - down here we have a grade of plywood that is referred to as "Marine Plywood" and it's pricey but great stuff

thanks for the update
Em

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Mello Yello wrote:

hahaha, got me figured don'tcha Dave - - - - that raised floor idea sounds like the "cat's meow" - - - down here we have a grade of plywood that is referred to as "Marine Plywood" and it's pricey but great stuff

thanks for the update
Em


 I can find marine plywood too, but it comes in 5'x10' size locally and is way beyond expensive. I'll just buy a $35 cabinet grade chunk, cut it to size, screw it down and be done with it. If I hadn't had to cut such a big hole to replumb, probably could get away with just using 2 or 3 one foot wide strips instead of a 30x60 inch piece.



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Ooooooooooo ICnow

__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 4169
Date:

treated plywood will work dang good in we areas to. i dont know how much it is now but it does bold up good.


__________________
born with nothin....still got most of it...


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

geezer69 wrote:

treated plywood will work dang good in we areas to. i dont know how much it is now but it does bold up good.


 That is what I ended up with $38 with sales tax. If I work fast, maybe can get it installed before it twists and turns as it is about dead flat as I type thisbiggrin



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 4169
Date:

dang dave. that stuff has gone up !!!! but, its worth it. heck, peace of mine is worth a few bucks.i thought about puttin it on one of our decks and makin a puttin green up bout 24' off the ground. but at that price,,,i dont think so, hahaha

__________________
born with nothin....still got most of it...


Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

A question for the 'rockers in our group  (not the music kinddisbelief)

Is there any reason I can't use moisture resistant drywall to patch the closet wall I've opened to install the new tub? I need about a 1/4 sheet for the tub side and about a 1/2 sheet to fix the closet. Since being at least 1/4 Scottish with deep pockets and short arms don't want to buy any more $10/each dry wall then I need  (that stuff got expensive since the last I bought a year or so ago)



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 9419
Date:

Unless Rat or Mego has another opinion, I think it would be fine to use - - - - especially in the closet - - - to me drywall is drywall once it's nailed up - - - might take an extra coat of paint to cover would be all



__________________

"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



Senior Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 1943
Date:

Mello Yello wrote:

Unless Rat or Mego has another opinion, I think it would be fine to use - - - - especially in the closet - - - to me drywall is drywall once it's nailed up - - - might take an extra coat of paint to cover would be all


 That's kinda what I thought as well. Paint and over my taping - hides lots of 'sins'. Thanks



__________________

Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)

1 2  >  Last»  | Page of 2  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard