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Post Info TOPIC: Just a question to those who know


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Just a question to those who know


I just returned from the lumber yard with 3 pieces of 1 x 3 errrrr 3/4 x 2-1/2 I mean. I understand sizing - but not why. In 1969 I along with my, thankfully, ex bought a house built about the 1950-1952 era. It was built with honest to golly actual sized 2"x4", 2"x6", and so on lumber. Somewhere along the line, those sizes went to 1-3/4 x 3-3/4 as my FIL gave me a bunch left over from him building houses. Great - free building materials - oh crud, I had to buy some more to finish a garage wall - and it's now 1-1/2 x 3-1/2. Yep, that garage has all three sizes - and along one wall which made it real interesting to 'rock. Now, 2013, that garage is still standing - but that's not my question. My question is -

1 - why did these 2 by building materials change from actual size to what it is today.

Then for the heck of it a second question

2 - why are the edges of 2 by lumber radiused and wood like the 1 x 3 pine that I just bought stay with sharp edges.

And you wonder why I can't sleep at night with earth shattering but unexplained details like this. OMG, OMG, OMG



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Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



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My thoughts...they may be right, but maybe not

The 1x3 and other sized boards are not radiused, so the can be glued together to build furniture etc

Some mills still sell full sized construction grade lumber. We have one around here. I think they call it rough sawed lumber. To look better for the contractors and public, it is further planed and smoothed.

My wifes cousin built a large shed (barn) with rough sawed.....I thought the rustic look was great. Easy to get a big splinter in your hand though

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There's still a few small mills around here where you can get ruff cut pine and oak - - - - I've used the oak many times with great success on barns, stalls and etc.



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I think it's economics, Dave, at least mainly.  I, too, remember true to size lumber, and in my youth a 2 x 4 was just that, and rough; splinters were a way of life, and many modern day d-i-y folks didn't want to put up with it.  So mills started to plane a bit off to smooth the sticks, and they radiused the corners for the same reason.  Then, the bean counters got their heads into the mix, better saw blades were developed with narrower kerfs and smoother cutting teeth, and they got to where the mill saws to just short of the smaller dimension, takes a skin off and radiuses the corners with the planing line, and somewhere along the way, they get another board or three out of the same tree.  The board stock with the sharp corners is supposedly for ease of joinery; a lot of that quality of lumber is suitable as it comes from the mill for general quality (rough) joinery; the edges are straight and true, and smooth enough for a less than precision glue up, and it seems to me that in the modern scheme of things, edge joinery for large glue ups is becomeing a thing of the past; veneered plywood with bookmatched veneers is easy to find and looks almost like a glued up sheeet, is much more stable, is easier to handle, and in the long run, less expensive in terms of time, and effort.



-- Edited by Rrumbler on Wednesday 27th of February 2013 04:20:45 PM

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I think everybody is pretty much right,, Back in the boom days of logging,, the trees were almost4-5 feet across and bigger,, and they got alot od product out of each tree,  but those big gtrees are long gone, the ones that are left are not to be cut down at no cost,, thanks to the enviromentalist,, they would rather see them rot and melt into the ground,

so today nearly all timber comes from the fast growing replants they have growing on timber farms, maybe a big log these days will be 12 -14" across. so not much product from each tree,

The rough cut timber is sold as the real 2x4,2x6 etc then run through a planer to create a finished piece of lumber,, and you end up with the 1 3/4x31/2 pieces with rounded edges,, and mostly splenterless,,

up here we see trainloads of timber on rail cars headed for the saw mills,, maybe 50-75 logs on one car,, where in the old days maybe 1-2 logs per car, 

But honestly I don't have a clue why they are different,, maybe to get more product out of a tinny-winney log,, but that sounded good didn't it??biggrin you don't have to answere that if ya don't wanna,,,confuse

 

http://forestcitytree.wordpress.com/2013/01/18/big-trees-of-the-pacific-northwest/



-- Edited by Bad Rat on Wednesday 27th of February 2013 05:00:43 PM

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it was changed to get a little more lumber out of the timber. i hired a guy as a carpenter on time and not long after i sent him to our shop to pick up a load of 2x6's. he came back empty. he said...all i could find was 1 1/2x5 1/2. hahaha.. i didnt fire him. he was desperate and made a dang good labor. worked for me a good while. when i left i got him a job with my concrete guy.

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All sound like good reasons - just had me curious as I had all three sizes in that old house - and those actual 2x4's - were smooth finished as were the in betweens.

Got to thinking about it some more -  my last home, post and beam construction, was built by a builder for his own family and he too used quite a bit actual full dimensioned wood, very rough sawn from wood he harvested on the property - shag bark hickory from a big grove. Most of the outside walls and roof rafters were framed from that wood though the inside partitions were conventional. Also had the siding sawn from that hickory too, but when it dried, it was very prone to splitting. Got rid of the ex and sold the house, both of which I really disliked at that point, all in one sitting with a lawyerbiggrinbiggrinbiggrinbiggrin.

 

Now (Hijacked my own thread, Bill) - back to a bath tub installation thread.

Did I say I do NOT like plumbing work? Especially when it has to be done by grope and feel.



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Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

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Dave W wrote:

All sound like good reasons - just had me curious as I had all three sizes in that old house - and those actual 2x4's - were smooth finished as were the in betweens.

Got to thinking about it some more -  my last home, post and beam construction, was built by a builder for his own family and he too used quite a bit actual full dimensioned wood, very rough sawn from wood he harvested on the property - shag bark hickory from a big grove. Most of the outside walls and roof rafters were framed from that wood though the inside partitions were conventional. Also had the siding sawn from that hickory too, but when it dried, it was very prone to splitting. Got rid of the ex and sold the house, both of which I really disliked at that point, all in one sitting with a lawyerbiggrinbiggrinbiggrinbiggrin.

 

Now (Hijacked my own thread, Bill) - back to a bath tub installation thread.

Did I say I do NOT like plumbing work? Especially when it has to be done by grope and feel.


 restart hijack ,,, My house was built in 1955, and is built with all vertical grain fir,, not a knot anywhere, the siding on the studs is 1x12 v/g fir T&G same with the roof, which is 2x6 vgf t&g, 

Oregon is timber country, so I assume that lumber was pretty reasonable.. back then,, most homes were roofed with hand split cedar shingles, untill the insurance co's decided they could charge alot more for homes that had the shingles , because of fire possablities,,

OK Back to the HIGHJACK = ON



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