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Post Info TOPIC: Something to consider


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Something to consider


I'm in the process of doing my quarterly painting of bedrooms (no, not 4x a year but every quarter century). Since we have recessed lighting which dates the house to the '70s, I decided it's about time to install new fixtures. This bedroom has an attic above it with blown in insulation along with some fiberglass batts thatsomeone else put in to help to keep heating costs down. They were NOT careful and covered this fixture.

Yes, it is burned and melted on that reflector and possibly the reason we have had a smoky smell a couple times in the past!!!!!!!

I had looked at the rest of them but never got that far back to check this one out - that 'glass insulation and the blown in crap is stuff my 'system' can't handle without a mask and a very long shower afterwards. This and one other will be replaced to match the rest that have already been done at great expense to my aging body

 



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Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



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Ouch, that is Scary indeed - - - - thanks for the info, Dave.

Em

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We redid our house back in 1996 or so.....it had 60 amp wiring in it from the early 50s. There were 4 fuses in the panel. Of course, over the years, the kitchen had toasters, microwave, dishwasher etc added. When we tore out the electrical, a couple of the joists that electrical boxes were blackened by the excess heat.....Upgraded just in time.

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I installed a new J box this afternoon and will put the drywall patch in tomorrow - then hope my DW can come up with a fixture to replace the bulb and socket that's just dangling from the ceiling. The two recessed fixtures left in a closet and my TV room have LED bulbs with a bunch less heat even though the insulation was pulled back years ago.

This house has only a 100 amp service but so far I've been able to run all of my tools, 110 and 220VAC and any appliance but try to not run anything heavy (compressor, table or radial arm saw) if the dryer is on. It does have a 24V lighting system - a relay panel then ships the 110V to whatever circuit is needed so there is only one 15 amp service to that panel. That reflector is the only problem I've seen anywhere though.

I really could miss the 400 amp service at the last house if we had any more power draw again - like two out buildings, a deep well pump and a @#$% swimming pool.



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Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)

CHS


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We have the same lighting as our house was built in 1974.  2 in the bedroom we pulled out and are now LED. The 3 in the hallway areas will have flush mount fixtures that cover the old hole, if like you, my wife can decide on which ones. we're changing them out as we removed all the popcorn ceilings and it seemed like a good time to do it.

Fun fact or the day..................did you know that 1" of rigid insulation, (R-7), will recoup approximately 80% of your heat?  The rest is all fluff to get to that higher R value.  Don't tell that to your power company as they will certainly refute it. I have the graphs and math from a saavy engineer. Just sayin..........:)



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CHS wrote:

............... as we removed all the popcorn ceilings and it seemed like a good time to do it.



 Question - how did you remove that @#$%^&% popcorn? The last house had them and I swore that never ever would I own another with that nasty stuff - and don't. I had to have a contractor come in and redo the (very large) kitchen from a repair after digging out a huge bee nest in the joists.  A bunch of $$ as in 1990 there was no DIY kit available plus he had to do the entire kitchen to match the shading.

As a note, my wife found a couple of acceptable fixtures at Lowe's. One will go in the BR that's being done now and the other is for another BR that will get done (maybe) right afterwards. The patch in the ceiling had the last coat of mud about 5:00PM and should be ready for paint tomorrow or Friday, depending on how the final wall prep goes. For whatever reason, my last paint job caught a bunch of crud and I need to sand the walls down.



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Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)

CHS


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We used a tool from Home Depot that's made for it. Attaches to a handle, has a scraper that you attach a bag to and when it gets too heavy, you replace it. Ours had asbestos in it but they will allow a homeowner to do it instead of hiring the $$$ asbestos abatement contractor. You wet it down good first with a garden sprayer, let it sit and it peels off easier, unless it's has lot's of paint like ours. Wear a mask made for asbestos, keep doors open and a fan going just in case and vacuum good when done. All of it had to be double bagged with 6 mil bags and brought to a special dump facility. Not expensive but a lotta work.  Gotta hand it to my wife, she did most of it.

We didn't get a bid from a contractor as I knew it would break the bank. This is the last house we are going to live in, seriously, so any and all projects around here are with that in mind, not for resale purposes.  It all started because there was no attic access on the right half of the house. It's split by a big vaulted living room, there is attic access in the garage for the left half but the right half, bonehead furnace guy, who added gas heat later, used the hallway access panel on the right half for one of the return air locations. confuse  Well, at least now I can get in the other attic...............



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When I had my drywall Company in the Rockies, we refused to do acoustical ceiling sprays/aka popcorn and, even tho we lost a few jobs, it was by far the best decision for us. In the long run it was best for those that took our advice and settled for a broom and troweled application if heavier texture was something they desired.

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Now I'm curious about that tool and since I'm about to go to HD for a 12" roller for ceilings, will take a look. What I had then was a 1982 built house and hopefully asbestos had already been removed (1972 was the supposed removal date).

Oh and that 12" roller will be my first time trying that size. With the new low/no VOC paints I'm seeing too many of what look like dry/thin spots when I paint ceilings instead of a good solid covering.

This house we are in probably had some paint with asbestos, built in 1970, but everything has been encapsulated pretty well by several more coats since we moved in or in the case of window, door and base moldings, mostly all been replaced after the POs had trashed anything wood or when I replaced the single pane windows with doubles (did I ever say this house has been a DIY project for our 20 years living hereconfusebiggrin)



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Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



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OK - went to HD and no 'popcorn' removal tool at that store but a DIY popcorn repair kit was sitting on the shelf.

Picked up the 12" roller. handle and pan (~$15 for the three) and have to say that painting a 12x16 foot bedroom ceiling seemed to take less then half the amount of time of the usual 9" roller. There is one downfall with that bigger roller - it weighs a bunch more full of paint and it about whooped me out of commission for an hour after. It did a nice job with a single coat instead of the usual two.  Talking with a pro when I was picking it out - he tried to talk me into an 18" and a different type of much heavier handle. I can only visualize this OF lying on my back, huffing and puffing after swinging that thing!!!

Back to the 9" roller tomorrow and the walls (except the DW 'isn't sure' about the color - @#$%)




-- Edited by Dave W on Thursday 12th of March 2015 08:44:45 PM

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Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)



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Dave W wrote:

Back to the 9" roller tomorrow and the walls (except the DW 'isn't sure' about the color - @#$%)




-- Edited by Dave W on Thursday 12th of March 2015 08:44:45 PM


 Oh yeah - that again statement above came true and again bit any 'schedule' I had in my puny mind in the posterior of my creaky body.

The little lady went out and bought a can of pure white to try to cut the color down from blinding 'lavender' to something more muteddisbeliefconfuseevileye



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Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)

CHS


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Dave W wrote:

Now I'm curious about that tool and since I'm about to go to HD for a 12" roller for ceilings, will take a look. What I had then was a 1982 built house and hopefully asbestos had already been removed (1972 was the supposed removal date).



 Dave, The guy at the testing facility told me it was 1984 and on for sure. 70's and to that point, some were following the "rules" and some didn't care so it's a mixed bag up until then.  Got 3 areas left to paint and then done.  Had to put in a new water heater in yesterday..........mama don't like cold showers! It was 17 years old so can't complain too loud.



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CHS wrote:
Dave W wrote:

Now I'm curious about that tool and since I'm about to go to HD for a 12" roller for ceilings, will take a look. What I had then was a 1982 built house and hopefully asbestos had already been removed (1972 was the supposed removal date).



 Dave, The guy at the testing facility told me it was 1984 and on for sure. 70's and to that point, some were following the "rules" and some didn't care so it's a mixed bag up until then.  Got 3 areas left to paint and then done.  Had to put in a new water heater in yesterday..........mama don't like cold showers! It was 17 years old so can't complain too loud.


 Just because I could, looked up the banning of asbestos - and yes there was a law, 1989 but in part was overturned and there is still some being used today though I didn't dig far enough to see what. I actually worked with it some 50 years ago while casting very large bearings for steam turbines. The job 'leader' ended up dying from mesothelioma a few years after I went on to better things (got my degreebiggrin). Then the wife's ex was a submariner and also died of that disease about 5 years ago.

Nasty stuff - just happy I got out of any contact when I did

This is a bunch of info if you want to look further: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asbestos

As far as my painting - gettin' there, slow but sure after some delays ...........



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Dave W (Irelands Child/IC2)

Quando omni flunkus, moritati (When all else fails, play dead - R Green)

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