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Post Info TOPIC: House wrap when residing


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House wrap when residing


Having fixed the roof leaks with a new roof, now the siding looks even worse than it did before.  So that's on the agenda for this year, but the finances might make it next......

 

The background:

 

1) It's a FREAKING glorified trailer, so it's built dumb.

 

2) Currently has vinyl siding, and will replace with same.

 

3) I put new windows in a few years ago, with expanding foam, etc., so they are going to STAY in their holes. 

 

The plan:

 

Remove old siding, install foam board insulation,  house wrap, the new siding, along with replace both crappy trailer doors with real doors.

 

Which brings up one question.  What order to install?   I've been told, and it's the only way I've seen it done up until now, wrap the house, then the foam, then the siding.    However, when I was at the lumberyard talking to the dude, he said,  "Foam panels first, then the wrap, then the siding."    After which I was told in no uncertain terms by another dude, "30 years of standard construction practice, wrap first, then the foam."   Which brought on the web searches.    If you go to the web sites of the places that make the wrap, they say, "Outside of the sheathing, under the siding." but mostly the pictures show no foam being added.   On the sites that do show foam, they are all placing the wrap over it.

 

Now I know which way I'm leaning............  Which just leaves the next question.   Styrofoam or rigid polyisocyanurate foam (that's the stuff with the shiny layer on both sides)   My goal is to add an R-5.

 

In Styrofoam, that's 1"x4x8, R-5, $14.78. 

Polyisocyanurate 1x4x8, R-6, $19.82

Polyisocyanurate 3/4x4x8, R-4.4, $15.32

Polystyrene insulation, (expanded rather than extruded, aka beadboard), 1x4x8, R-4, $6.99

 

I reckon another alternative would be to forgo the wrap, use the fancy tape on all the joints of the styrofoam.   Making the styrofoam do double duty as the house wrap as I saw in at least one video on the net.

 

I'm not physically up to this task, so framing the normal doors into this STUPID FREAKING GLORIFIED TRAILER will be his problem.   I'm just curious about opinions on the house warp and insulation.

 

Beadboard is the cheapest by far, but not really an option I'm interested in.  Polyisocyanurate is expensive but is 1 R factor higher in comparable thicknesses.   Maybe styrofoam, taped, forgo the wrap?  Or  both tape and wrap, tape isn't that expensive even though it is expensive for tape.  The styrofoam is tongue and groove for a better sheet to sheet seal, whereas the polyiso is square edged.   Cost DOES count.

 

My head hurts just thinking about the possible combinations of doing this. bleh

 



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Dale,

Farwell, Michigan

Wheel Horse:
C-Horse (part C-141, part Commando 800)
C-101SS


Kubota BX-2670 w/50" blower & 60" mower



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Who da thunk it......

"In Cold Climates, R-5 Foam Beats R-6
Although extruded polystyrene (XPS) is rated at R-5 per inch, it performs better than R-6 polyiso in cold temperatures......"


www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/musings/cold-climates-r-5-foam-beats-r-6

Does make the choices a little easier.....

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Dale,

Farwell, Michigan

Wheel Horse:
C-Horse (part C-141, part Commando 800)
C-101SS


Kubota BX-2670 w/50" blower & 60" mower



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Dang, Dale, I got winded just reading what you have in store biggrin but it sounds to me that you have a pretty good grip on your options. The "ONLY" time I have ever ?wrapped? (not including toilet paper on the Principal's house when I was a wee thang) any walls was in Colorado when we would put visquine on the interior walls before hanging the drywall. You also mentioned tape and I have heard great things about Gorilla Tape but "have not" used it YET. Also when you say beadboard, are you talking about the siding? Down here in Humidville they use a lot of Hardi Board very successfully and also what we call T-one-eleven but could be nutter name up there.

Once you get this done you are gonna know what "Cozy" is all about so GOOD LUCK.

Em



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"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



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There is special tape for house wrap, such as Tyvek, also specialized tape for joints in Styrofoam. We've used Gorilla tape, it's like super duty duct tape, but for taping the house wrap or Styrofoam, I'd stick to the specialized tape made specifically for the application. To me, not using the specialized tape would be akin to using a box end wrench and feeling it "just right" instead of using a torque wrench. Might work, but sticking to the specialized tool is sometimes worth it.

Ah, beadboard. A confusing term. Styrofoam is extruded polystyrene, you can see the lines or grain in it. Beadboard is a generic term for expanded polystyrene. You know that foam stuff that your new tv or whatever was packed in in that cardboard box? White, bunch of little beads stuck together. That's expanded polystyrene. When ran out into a sheet, or a "board" you have...... walla beadboard. LOL

Visquine on the interior walls is a vapor barrier. House wrap on the outside is sumptin' different. A back up you might say to keep the sheathing dry when the vinyl siding leaks, and it does. Stops wind from leaking though. A quick way to cover the cheap butt OSB siding they use now so it's protected from the weather until the siding goes on. Does duty on several accounts really.

So yeah, I know the terms, worked with everything above short of the house wrap, which I'm getting opposing strategies of application on. I reckon one way to go is whatever the contractor does. Too big of a job for this broken down body. But, like the roof we just had done, I have certain opinions on the way it SHOULD be done, and I like to find contractors who think the same way I do. Like removing the old shingles rather than leaving them in place. By removing the shingles, they found bad spots in the OSB sheathing, which they pulled up to replace, with OSB off, they found some damp insulation, also replaced. Placing a second roof over the first only covers up hidden problems, and reduces the snow load. Something to consider in my climate!

Dang, but I do seem to like writing novels............

__________________

Dale,

Farwell, Michigan

Wheel Horse:
C-Horse (part C-141, part Commando 800)
C-101SS


Kubota BX-2670 w/50" blower & 60" mower



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I certainly understand about using what's made for the job and it's funny how different names/titles/etc can change from area to area. Attached is what we call beadboard and it was used on the ceiling of lots of older homes in Texas. It was very popular as ceilings for porches.

I also understand about "Too big of a job for this broken down body."

After using carpet tape to put down my trunk liner in the '62 I found out what sticky tape is all about.  I pretty much figured that the Gorilla Tape was just better Duct Tape with a price tag.



-- Edited by Mello Yello on Wednesday 3rd of June 2015 10:26:04 AM

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"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



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LOL, THAT is another kind of beadboard. Isn't English wonderful? I've dun forgot what word it was, but I looked up something in the dictionary a few days ago for some dumb reason. That one word had over FIFTY definitions!!

__________________

Dale,

Farwell, Michigan

Wheel Horse:
C-Horse (part C-141, part Commando 800)
C-101SS


Kubota BX-2670 w/50" blower & 60" mower



Guru

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Hell, we do good to remember one, eh Dale? LMAO

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"Life is a Poem - - it has Rhyme and Reason" author: Me



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We did a lot of that Vapor barrier Visqueen over the interior  insulation when in Colorado, also, but the exterior coverings ( usually T 111 , cedar siding or plastered, ) usually had the black plastic type Visqueen installed over the Plywood and under the siding ( whichever that might be) for a vapor barrier as Meller mentioned , some times they even used Roofing tar paper, instead of visqueen, depending  on how cheap the contractor was



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Mello Yello wrote:

Hell, we do good to remember one, eh Dale? LMAO


 YUP!



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Dale,

Farwell, Michigan

Wheel Horse:
C-Horse (part C-141, part Commando 800)
C-101SS


Kubota BX-2670 w/50" blower & 60" mower

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